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FAQ about Corona / Covid-19

Deutschlandweit
Question ID: 814

Should I cancel my international trip?

Question
Should I cancel my international trip? Reisen

Reply

CDC provides recommendations for international travel, including guidance on when to consider postponing or canceling travel. Most of the time, this guidance is provided through travel health notices and is based on the potential health risks associated with traveling to a certain destination.

Travel health notices are designated as Level 1, 2, or 3, depending on the situation in that destination. (See below for what each level means). A list of destinations with coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) travel health notices is available.

  • Warning Level 3: CDC recommends travelers avoid all nonessential travel to these destinations.
  • Alert Level 2: CDC recommends older adults and people of any age with serious chronic medical conditions consider postponing nonessential travel.
  • Watch Level 1: CDC does not recommend canceling or postponing travel to destinations with, but it is important to take steps to prevent getting and spreading diseases during travel.

CDC also recommends all travelers, defer all cruise travel worldwide. This is particularly important for older adults and people of any age with serious chronic medical conditions.

If you do travel, take the following steps to help reduce your chances of getting sick:

  • Avoid contact with sick people.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Soap and water should be used if hands are visibly dirty.
    • It is especially important to clean hands after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose.

Make sure you are up to date with your routine vaccinations, including measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine and the seasonal flu vaccine.

The COVID-19 pandemic is a rapidly evolving situation and CDC guidance is reviewed daily and updated frequently.

Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

Travel: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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Deutschlandweit
Question ID: 815

Are international layovers included in CDC

Question
Are international layovers included in CDC Reisen

Reply

Yes. Airport layovers in international destinations with a level 3 travel health notice are included in CDC Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

Travel: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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Deutschlandweit
Question ID: 816

What is the risk of getting COVID-19 on an airplane?

Question
What is the risk of getting COVID-19 on an airplane? Reisen

Reply

Because of how air circulates and is filtered on airplanes, most viruses and other germs do not spread easily. Although the risk of infection on an airplane is low, try to avoid contact with sick passengers and wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

For more information: Exposure Risk During Travel

Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

Travel: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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Deutschlandweit
Question ID: 817

What happens if there is a sick passenger on an international or domestic flight?

Question
What happens if there is a sick passenger on an international or domestic flight? Reisen

Reply

Under current federal regulations, pilots must report all illnesses and deaths to CDC before arriving to a US destination. According to CDC disease protocols, if a sick traveler is considered to be a public health risk, CDC works with local and state health departments and international public health agencies to contact passengers and crew exposed to that sick traveler.

Be sure to give the airline your current contact information when booking your ticket so you can be notified if you are exposed to a sick traveler on a flight.

For more information: Contact Investigation

Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

Travel: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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Deutschlandweit
Question ID: 818

Should I go on a cruise?

Question
Should I go on a cruise? Reisen

Reply

CDC recommends all travelers, particularly older adults and people of any age with serious chronic medical conditions defer all cruise ship travel worldwide. Recent reports of COVID-19 on cruise ships highlight the risk of infection to cruise ship passengers and crew. Like many other viruses, COVID-19 appears to spread more easily between people in close quarters aboard ships.

Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

Travel: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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Deutschlandweit
Question ID: 819

Should travelers wear facemasks?

Question
Should travelers wear facemasks? Reisen

Reply

CDC does not recommend that healthy travelers wear facemasks to protect themselves from COVID-19. Wear a facemask only if you are sick and coughing or sneezing to help prevent the spread of respiratory viruses to others. If you are well, it is more important to take these important steps to reduce your chances of getting sick:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • To the extent possible, avoid touching high-touch surfaces in public places Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Travel: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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Deutschlandweit
Question ID: 820

What can I expect when departing other countries?

Question
What can I expect when departing other countries? Reisen

Reply

Be aware that some countries are conducting exit screening for all passengers leaving their country. Before being permitted to board a departing flight, you may have your temperature taken and be asked questions about your travel history and health.

Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

Travel: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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Deutschlandweit
Question ID: 821

What can I expect when arriving to the United States?

Question
What can I expect when arriving to the United States? Reisen

Reply

At this time, travel restrictions and entry screening apply only to travelers arriving from some countries or regions with widespread ongoing spread of COVID-19. [Note: US policies are subject to change as the COVID-19 pandemic evolves.]

If you are coming from a country or a region with widespread ongoing transmission of COVID-19 (Level 3 Travel Heath Notice), you may be screened when you arrive in the United States. After you arrive home, take the following steps to protect yourself and others:

  1. Stay at home. Do not go to work, school, or leave your house for 14 days. Discuss your work situation with your employer.
  2. Monitor your health. Take your temperature with a thermometer two times a day and monitor for fever (temperature of 100.4°F/38°C or higher). Also watch for cough or trouble breathing.
  3. Practice social distancing within the home. Avoid contact with other people for the 14 days. Maintain distance (approximately 6 feet or 2 meters) from family members and others in the home when possible.

If you are coming from a country with ongoing community transmission (Level 2 Travel Health Notice), take the following steps to protect yourself and others:

  1. Monitor your health. Take your temperature with a thermometer two times a day and monitor for fever (temperature of 100.4°F/38°C or higher). Also watch for cough or trouble breathing.
  2. Practice social distancing. Stay out of crowded places and avoid group gatherings. Do not go to shopping malls or to the movies. Keep your distance from others (about 6 feet or 2 meters). Do not take public transportation, taxis, or ride-shares during this time.

Check CDC Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

Travel: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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Deutschlandweit
Question ID: 822

How are travelers from countries with a level 3 travel health notice being screened when they enter the United States?

Question
How are travelers from countries with a level 3 travel health notice being screened when they enter the United States? Reisen

Reply

At this time, American citizens, lawful permanent residents, and family members (as specified in the Presidential Proclamationexternal icon) who have been in countries with widespread ongoing transmission (Level 3 Travel Health Notice) within 14 days prior to their arrival will be allowed to enter the United States. Flights arriving from countries or regions with widespread ongoing transmission are being directed to certain airports in the United States. At these airports, travelers may be screened for COVID-19 symptoms such as fever, cough or trouble breathing, and they may be asked questions about their travel and possible exposure to COVID-19. Travelers without symptoms will be told to stay home, monitor their health, and practice social distancing. Travelers with symptoms will be directed to receive additional screening and health care.

Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

Travel: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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Deutschlandweit
Question ID: 823

After arriving from a country with a level 3 travel health notice related to COVID-19 when can I return to work?

Question
After arriving from a country with a level 3 travel health notice related to COVID-19 when can I return to work? Reisen

Reply

Currently, all travelers arriving from a country or region with widespread ongoing transmission of COVID-19 (Level 3 Travel Health Notice) should stay home for 14 days after their arrival. At home, they are expected to monitor their health and practice social distancing. To protect the health of others, these travelers should not to go to work, or school, or otherwise leave their home for any reason (other than seeking health care) for 14 days.

Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

Travel: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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Deutschlandweit
Question ID: 824

What if I recently traveled and get sick?

Question
What if I recently traveled and get sick? Reisen

Reply

See CDC Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

Travel: Frequently Asked Questions and Answers

Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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Deutschlandweit
Kinder
Question ID: 827

How can pregnant women protect themselves from getting COVID-19?

Question
How can pregnant women protect themselves from getting COVID-19? Kinder

Reply

Pregnant women should do the same things as the general public to avoid infection. You can help stop the spread of COVID-19 by taking these actions:

  • Cover your cough (using your elbow is a good technique)
  • Avoid people who are sick
  • Clean your hands often using soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer
  • Cover your cough (using your elbow is a good technique)
  • Avoid people who are sick
  • Clean your hands often using soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer
  • You can find additional information on preventing COVID-19 disease at CDC Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 828

    Can COVID-19 cause problems for a pregnancy?

    Question
    Can COVID-19 cause problems for a pregnancy? Kinder

    Reply

    We do not know at this time if COVID-19 would cause problems during pregnancy or affect the health of the baby after birth.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 829

    Can COVID-19 be passed from a pregnant woman to the fetus or newborn?

    Question
    Can COVID-19 be passed from a pregnant woman to the fetus or newborn? Kinder

    Reply

    We still do not know if a pregnant woman with COVID-19 can pass the virus that causes COVID-19 to her fetus or baby during pregnancy or delivery. No infants born to mothers with COVID-19 have tested positive for the COVID-19 virus. In these cases, which are a small number, the virus was not found in samples of amniotic fluid or breastmilk.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 830

    If a pregnant woman has COVID-19 during pregnancy, will it hurt the baby?

    Question
    If a pregnant woman has COVID-19 during pregnancy, will it hurt the baby? Kinder

    Reply

    We do not know at this time what if any risk is posed to infants of a pregnant woman who has COVID-19. There have been a small number of reported problems with pregnancy or delivery (e.g. preterm birth) in babies born to mothers who tested positive for COVID-19 during their pregnancy. However, it is not clear that these outcomes were related to maternal infection.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 864

    How can my family and I prepare for COVID-19?

    Question
    How can my family and I prepare for COVID-19? zu Hause

    Reply

    Create a household plan of action to help protect your health and the health of those you care about in the event of an outbreak of COVID-19 in your community:

    • Talk with the people who need to be included in your plan, and discuss what to do if a COVID-19 outbreak occurs in your community.
    • Plan ways to care for those who might be at greater risk for serious complications, particularly older adults and those with severe chronic medical conditions like heart, lung or kidney disease.
      • Make sure they have access to several weeks of medications and supplies in case you need to stay home for prolonged periods of time.
    • Get to know your neighbors and find out if your neighborhood has a website or social media page to stay connected.
    • Create a list of local organizations that you and your household can contact in the event you need access to information, healthcare services, support, and resources.
    • Create an emergency contact list of family, friends, neighbors, carpool drivers, health care providers, teachers, employers, the local public health department, and other community resources.
    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    FAQs for Individuals and Families

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 865

    What steps can my family take to reduce our risk of getting COVID-19?

    Question
    What steps can my family take to reduce our risk of getting COVID-19? zu Hause

    Reply

    Practice everyday preventive actions to help reduce your risk of getting sick and remind everyone in your home to do the same. These actions are especially important for older adults and people who have severe chronic medical conditions:

    • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
    • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.
    • Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue and throw the tissue in the trash.
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food.
    • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
    • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects
      (e.g., tables, countertops, light switches, doorknobs, and cabinet handles).
    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    FAQs for Individuals and Families

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 866

    What should I do if someone in my house gets sick with COVID-19?

    Question
    What should I do if someone in my house gets sick with COVID-19? zu Hause

    Reply

    Most people who get COVID-19 will be able to recover at home. CDC has directions for people who are recovering at home and their caregivers, including:

    • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.
    • If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. In adults, emergency warning signs*:
      • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
      • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
      • New confusion or inability to arouse
      • Bluish lips or face
      • *This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptom that is severe or concerning.
    • Use a separate room and bathroom for sick household members (if possible).
    • Clean hands regularly by handwashing with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
    • Provide your sick household member with clean disposable facemasks to wear at home, if available, to help prevent spreading COVID-19 to others.
    • Clean the sick room and bathroom, as needed, to avoid unnecessary contact with the sick person.
    • Avoid sharing personal items like utensils, food, and drinks.
    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    FAQs for Individuals and Families

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 867

    How can I prepare in case my child

    Question
    How can I prepare in case my child zu Hause

    Reply

    Talk to the school or facility about their emergency operations plan. Understand the plan for continuing education and social services (such as student meal programs) during school dismissals. If your child attends a college or university, encourage them to learn about the school Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    FAQs for Individuals and Families

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 868

    How can I prepare for COVID-19 at work?

    Question
    How can I prepare for COVID-19 at work? zu Hause

    Reply

    Plan for potential changes at your workplace. Talk to your employer about their emergency operations plan, including sick-leave policies and telework options. Learn how businesses and employers can plan for and respond to COVID-19.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    FAQs for Individuals and Families

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 869

    Should I use soap and water or a hand sanitizer to protect against COVID-19?

    Question
    Should I use soap and water or a hand sanitizer to protect against COVID-19? zu Hause

    Reply

    Handwashing is one of the best ways to protect yourself and your family from getting sick. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.

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    FAQs for Individuals and Families

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 870

    What cleaning products should I use to protect against COVID-19?

    Question
    What cleaning products should I use to protect against COVID-19? zu Hause

    Reply

    Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces such as tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.  If surfaces are dirty, clean them using detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection. To disinfect, most common EPA-registered household disinfectants will work. See CDC Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    FAQs for Individuals and Families

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Ansteckungsgefahr
    Question ID: 871

    What should I do if there is an outbreak in my community?

    Question
    What should I do if there is an outbreak in my community? Ansteckungsgefahr

    Reply

    During an outbreak, stay calm and put your preparedness plan to work. Follow the steps below:

    Protect yourself and others.

    • Stay home if you are sick. Keep away from people who are sick. Limit close contact with others as much as possible (about 6 feet).

    Put your household plan into action.

    • Stay informed about the local COVID-19 situation. Be aware of temporary school dismissals in your area, as this may affect your household Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

      FAQs for Individuals and Families

      Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Ansteckungsgefahr
    Question ID: 872

    How do I prepare my children in case of COVID-19 outbreak in our community?

    Question
    How do I prepare my children in case of COVID-19 outbreak in our community? Ansteckungsgefahr

    Reply

    Outbreaks can be stressful for adults and children. Talk with your children about the outbreak, try to stay calm, and reassure them that they are safe. If appropriate, explain to them that most illness from COVID-19 seems to be mild. Children respond differently to stressful situations than adults.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    FAQs for Individuals and Families

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Ansteckungsgefahr
    Question ID: 873

    What steps should parents take to protect children during a community outbreak?

    Question
    What steps should parents take to protect children during a community outbreak? Ansteckungsgefahr

    Reply

    This is a new virus and we are still learning about it, but so far, there does not seem to be a lot of illness in children. Most illness, including serious illness, is happening in adults of working age and older adults. If there cases of COVID-19 that impact your child Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    FAQs for Individuals and Families

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Ansteckungsgefahr
    Question ID: 874

    Will schools be dismissed if there is an outbreak in my community?

    Question
    Will schools be dismissed if there is an outbreak in my community? Ansteckungsgefahr

    Reply

    Depending on the situation, public health officials may recommend community actions to reduce exposures to COVID-19, such as school dismissals. Read or watch local media sources that report school dismissals or and watch for communication from your child Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    FAQs for Individuals and Families

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Ansteckungsgefahr
    Question ID: 875

    Should I go to work if there is an outbreak in my community?

    Question
    Should I go to work if there is an outbreak in my community? Ansteckungsgefahr

    Reply

    Follow the advice of your local health officials. Stay home if you can. Talk to your employer to discuss working from home, taking leave if you or someone in your household gets sick with COVID-19 symptoms, or if your child Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    FAQs for Individuals and Families

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 884

    Can the COVID-19 virus spread through drinking water?

    Question
    Can the COVID-19 virus spread through drinking water?

    Reply

    The COVID-19 virus has not been detected in drinking water. Conventional water treatment methods that use filtration and disinfection, such as those in most municipal drinking water systems, should remove or inactivate the virus that causes COVID-19.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Water Transmission and COVID-19

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 885

    Is the COVID-19 virus found in feces?

    Question
    Is the COVID-19 virus found in feces?

    Reply

    The virus that causes COVID-19 has been detected in the feces of some patients diagnosed with COVID-19. The amount of virus released from the body (shed) in stool, how long the virus is shed, and whether the virus in stool is infectious are not known.

    The risk of transmission of COVID-19 from the feces of an infected person is also unknown. However, the risk is expected to be low based on data from previous outbreaks of related coronaviruses, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). There have been no reports of fecal-oral transmission of COVID-19 to date.

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    Water Transmission and COVID-19

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 886

    Can the COVID-19 virus spread through pools and hot tubs?

    Question
    Can the COVID-19 virus spread through pools and hot tubs?

    Reply

    There is no evidence that COVID-19 can be spread to humans through the use of pools and hot tubs. Proper operation, maintenance, and disinfection (e.g., with chlorine and bromine) of pools and hot tubs should remove or inactivate the virus that causes COVID-19.

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    Water Transmission and COVID-19

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 887

    Can the COVID-19 virus spread through sewerage systems?

    Question
    Can the COVID-19 virus spread through sewerage systems?

    Reply

    CDC is reviewing all data on COVID-19 transmission as information becomes available. At this time, the risk of transmission of the virus that causes COVID-19 through sewerage systems is thought to be low. Although transmission of COVID-19 through sewage may be possible, there is no evidence to date that this has occurred. This guidance will be updated as necessary as new evidence is assessed.

    SARS, a similar coronavirus, has been detected in untreated sewage for up to 2 to 14 days. In the 2003 SARS outbreak, there was documented transmission associated with sewage aerosols. Data suggest that standard municipal wastewater system chlorination practices may be sufficient to inactivate coronaviruses, as long as utilities monitor free available chlorine during treatment to ensure it has not been depleted.

    Wastewater and sewage workers should use standard practices, practice basic hygiene precautions, and wear personal protective equipment (PPE) as prescribed for current work tasks.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Water Transmission and COVID-19

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 888

    Should wastewater workers take extra precautions to protect themselves from the COVID-19 virus?

    Question
    Should wastewater workers take extra precautions to protect themselves from the COVID-19 virus?

    Reply

    Wastewater treatment plant operations should ensure workers follow routine practices to prevent exposure to wastewater. These include using engineering and administrative controls, safe work practices, and PPE normally required for work tasks when handling untreated wastewater. No additional COVID-19 Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Water Transmission and COVID-19

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 889

    Should wastewater workers take extra precautions to protect themselves from the COVID-19 virus?

    Question
    Should wastewater workers take extra precautions to protect themselves from the COVID-19 virus?

    Reply

    Wastewater treatment plant operations should ensure workers follow routine practices to prevent exposure to wastewater. These include using engineering and administrative controls, safe work practices, and PPE normally required for work tasks when handling untreated wastewater. No additional COVID-19 Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Water Transmission and COVID-19

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 890

    What is a ‘novel

    Question
    What is a ‘novel

    Reply

    A novel coronavirus (CoV) is a new strain of coronavirus.

    The disease caused by the novel coronavirus first identified in Wuhan, China, has been named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): What parents should know

    UNICEF


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 891

    COVID-19 by the World Health Organization. What does that mean?

    Question
    COVID-19 by the World Health Organization. What does that mean?

    Reply

    Characterizing COVID-19 as a pandemic is not an indication that the virus has become deadlier. Rather, it Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): What parents should know

    UNICEF


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 892

    There

    Question
    There

    Reply

    There are a lot of myths and misinformation about coronavirus being shared online Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): What parents should know

    UNICEF


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 893

    How does the COVID-19 virus spread?

    Question
    How does the COVID-19 virus spread?

    Reply

    The virus is transmitted through direct contact with respiratory droplets of an infected person (generated through coughing and sneezing), and touching surfaces contaminated with the virus. The COVID-19 virus may survive on surfaces for several hours, but simple disinfectants can kill it.

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    Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): What parents should know

    UNICEF


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 896

    How can I avoid the risk of infection?

    Question
    How can I avoid the risk of infection?

    Reply

    Here are four precautions you and your family can take to avoid infection:

    Wash your hands frequently using soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub 

    Cover mouth and nose with flexed elbow or tissue when coughing or sneezing. Dispose of used tissue immediately

    Avoid close contact with anyone who has cold or flu-like symptoms

    Seek medical care early if you or your child has a fever, cough or difficulty breathing

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    Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): What parents should know

    UNICEF


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 899

    Should I wear a medical mask?

    Question
    Should I wear a medical mask?

    Reply

    The use of a medical mask is advised if you have respiratory symptoms (coughing or sneezing) to protect others. If you don Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): What parents should know

    UNICEF


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 900

    Does COVID-19 affect children?
    What should I do if my child has symptoms of COVID-19?

    Question
    Does COVID-19 affect children? What should I do if my child has symptoms of COVID-19?

    Reply

    This is a new virus and we do not know enough yet about how it affects children or pregnant women. We know it is possible for people of any age to be infected with the virus, but so far there have been relatively few cases of COVID-19 reported among children. The virus is fatal in rare cases, so far mainly among older people with pre-existing medical conditions.

    Seek medical attention, but remember that it Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): What parents should know

    UNICEF


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 901

    What should I do if a family member displays symptoms?

    Question
    What should I do if a family member displays symptoms?

    Reply

    You should seek medical care early if you or your child has a fever, cough or difficulty breathing. Consider calling ahead to tell your health care provider if you have traveled to an area where COVID-19 has been reported, or if you have been in close contact with someone with who has traveled from one of these areas and has respiratory symptoms.

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    Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): What parents should know

    UNICEF


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 902

    Should I take my child out of school?

    Question
    Should I take my child out of school?

    Reply

    If your child shows symptoms of COVID-19, seek medical care, and follow the instructions from the health care provider. Otherwise, as with other respiratory infections like the flu, keep your child well rested at home while symptomatic, and avoid going to public places, to prevent spread to others.

    When possible, it Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): What parents should know

    UNICEF


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 903

    What precautions should I take for my family if we travel?

    Question
    What precautions should I take for my family if we travel?

    Reply

    Anyone planning a trip overseas should always check the travel advisory for their destination country for any restrictions on entry, quarantine requirements on entry, or other relevant travel advice.

    In addition to taking standard travel precautions, and in order to avoid being quarantined or denied re-entry into your home country, you are also advised to check the latest COVID-19 update on the International Air Transport Association website, which includes a list of countries and restriction measures.

    While traveling, all parents should follow standard hygiene measures for themselves and their children: Wash hands frequently or use an alcohol-based sanitizer with at least 60 per cent alcohol, practice good respiratory hygiene (cover your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze and immediately dispose of the used tissue) and avoid close contact with anyone who is coughing or sneezing. In addition, it is recommended that parents always carry a hand sanitizer, pack of disposable tissues, and disinfecting wipes.

    Additional recommendations include: Clean your seat, armrest, touchscreen, etc. with a disinfecting wipe once inside an aircraft or other vehicle. Also use a disinfecting wipe to clean key surfaces, doorknobs, remote controls, etc at the hotel or other accommodation where you and your children are staying.

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    Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): What parents should know

    UNICEF


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 904

    Can pregnant women pass coronavirus to unborn children?

    Question
    Can pregnant women pass coronavirus to unborn children?

    Reply

    At this time, there is not enough evidence to determine whether the virus is transmitted from a mother to her baby during pregnancy, or the potential impact this may have on the baby. This is currently being investigated. Pregnant women should continue to follow appropriate precautions to protect themselves from exposure to the virus, and seek medical care early, if experiencing symptoms, such as fever, cough or difficulty breathing.

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    Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): What parents should know

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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 905

    Is it safe for a mother to breastfeed if she is infected with coronavirus?

    Question
    Is it safe for a mother to breastfeed if she is infected with coronavirus?

    Reply

    All mothers in affected and at-risk areas who have symptoms of fever, cough or difficulty breathing, should seek medical care early, and follow instructions from a health care provider. 

    Considering the benefits of breastfeeding and the insignificant role of breastmilk in the transmission of other respiratory viruses, the mother can continue breastfeeding, while applying all the necessary precautions.

    For symptomatic mothers well enough to breastfeed, this includes wearing a mask when near a child (including during feeding), washing hands before and after contact with the child (including feeding), and cleaning/disinfecting contaminated surfaces Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus disease (COVID-19): What parents should know

    UNICEF


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    Deutschlandweit
    Question ID: 909

    What is UNICEF doing to help?

    Question
    What is UNICEF doing to help?

    Reply

    UNICEF is working with the World Health Organization, governments and partners to equip children, pregnant women and their families with the information they need to know on how to prevent the spread of COVID-19. This includes the development of online training modules for health workers, and FAQs and guidance for parents, pregnant women and children. 

    As of 15 March, UNICEF had delivered a total of almost 300,000 N95 and surgical masks and 1.2 million surgical gloves among other equipment to the Government of China for immediate dispatch to Wuhan and Beijing. Regionally, UNICEF and partners have reached some 86 million affected people in East Asia and the Pacific and South Asia with prevention messages, mainly around handwashing.

    UNICEF is also tackling misinformation about the virus by working with online partners like Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and TikTok to make sure that accurate advice is available, as well as taking steps to inform the public when inaccurate information emerges.

    On 25 March, UNICEF announced it had raised its COVID-19 appeal to $651.6 million.

    Read more about UNICEF's appeal

     

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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 916

    What is a novel coronavirus?

    Question
    What is a novel coronavirus? Kinder

    Reply

    A novel coronavirus is a new coronavirus that has not been previously identified. The virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is not the same as the coronaviruses that commonly circulate among humans and cause mild illness, like the common cold.

    A diagnosis with coronavirus 229E, NL63, OC43, or HKU1 is not the same as a COVID-19 diagnosis. Patients with COVID-19 will be evaluated and cared for differently than patients with common coronavirus diagnosis.

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    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Kinder
    Question ID: 917

    Why is the disease being called coronavirus disease 2019, COVID-19?

    Question
    Why is the disease being called coronavirus disease 2019, COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    On February 11, 2020 the World Health Organization announced an official name for the disease that is causing the 2019 novel coronavirus outbreak, first identified in Wuhan China. The new name of this disease is coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated as COVID-19. In COVID-19, ‘CO Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Kinder
    Question ID: 918

    Why might someone blame or avoid individuals and groups (create stigma) because of COVID-19?

    Question
    Why might someone blame or avoid individuals and groups (create stigma) because of COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    People in the U.S. may be worried or anxious about friends and relatives who are living in or visiting areas where COVID-19 is spreading. Some people are worried about the disease. Fear and anxiety can lead to social stigma, for example, towards Chinese or other Asian Americans or people who were in quarantine.

    Stigma is discrimination against an identifiable group of people, a place, or a nation. Stigma is associated with a lack of knowledge about how COVID-19 spreads, a need to blame someone, fears about disease and death, and gossip that spreads rumors and myths.

    Stigma hurts everyone by creating more fear or anger towards ordinary people instead of the disease that is causing the problem.

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    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Kinder
    Question ID: 919

    How can people help stop stigma related to COVID-19?

    Question
    How can people help stop stigma related to COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    People can fight stigma and help, not hurt, others by providing social support. Counter stigma by learning and sharing facts. Communicating the facts that viruses do not target specific racial or ethnic groups and how COVID-19 actually spreads can help stop stigma.

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    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

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    Question ID: 920

    What is the source of the virus?

    Question
    What is the source of the virus? Kinder

    Reply

    Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some cause illness in people, and others, such as canine and feline coronaviruses, only infect animals. Rarely, animal coronaviruses that infect animals have emerged to infect people and can spread between people. This is suspected to have occurred for the virus that causes COVID-19. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) are two other examples of coronaviruses that originated from animals and then spread to people. More information about the source and spread of COVID-19 is available on the Situation Summary: Source and Spread of the Virus.

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    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

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    Question ID: 921

    How does the virus spread?

    Question
    How does the virus spread? Kinder

    Reply

    This virus was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. The first infections were linked to a live animal market, but the virus is now spreading from person-to-person. It Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Question ID: 922

    Can someone who has had COVID-19 spread the illness to others?

    Question
    Can someone who has had COVID-19 spread the illness to others? Kinder

    Reply

    The virus that causes COVID-19 is spreading from person-to-person. Someone who is actively sick with COVID-19 can spread the illness to others. That is why CDC recommends that these patients be isolated either in the hospital or at home (depending on how sick they are) until they are better and no longer pose a risk of infecting others.

    How long someone is actively sick can vary so the decision on when to release someone from isolation is made on a case-by-case basis in consultation with doctors, infection prevention and control experts, and public health officials and involves considering specifics of each situation including disease severity, illness signs and symptoms, and results of laboratory testing for that patient.

    Current CDC guidance for when it is OK to release someone from isolation is made on a case by case basis and includes meeting all of the following requirements:

    • The patient is free from fever without the use of fever-reducing medications.
    • The patient is no longer showing symptoms, including cough.
    • The patient has tested negative on at least two consecutive respiratory specimens collected at least 24 hours apart.

    Someone who has been released from isolation is not considered to pose a risk of infection to others.

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    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Kinder
    Question ID: 923

    Can someone who has been quarantined for COVID-19 spread the illness to others?

    Question
    Can someone who has been quarantined for COVID-19 spread the illness to others? Kinder

    Reply

    Quarantine means separating a person or group of people who have been exposed to a contagious disease but have not developed illness (symptoms) from others who have not been exposed, in order to prevent the possible spread of that disease. Quarantine is usually established for the incubation period of the communicable disease, which is the span of time during which people have developed illness after exposure. For COVID-19, the period of quarantine is 14 days from the last date of exposure, because 14 days is the longest incubation period seen for similar coronaviruses. Someone who has been released from COVID-19 quarantine is not considered a risk for spreading the virus to others because they have not developed illness during the incubation period.

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    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

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    Question ID: 924

    Can the virus that causes COVID-19 be spread through food, including refrigerated or frozen food?

    Question
    Can the virus that causes COVID-19 be spread through food, including refrigerated or frozen food? Kinder

    Reply

    Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread from person-to-person through respiratory droplets. Currently there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with food. Before preparing or eating food it is important to always wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds for general food safety. Throughout the day wash your hands after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing, or going to the bathroom.

    It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

    In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely very low risk of spread from food products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks at ambient, refrigerated, or frozen temperatures.

    Learn what is known about the spread of COVID-19.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 925

    Will warm weather stop the outbreak of COVID-19?

    Question
    Will warm weather stop the outbreak of COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    It is not yet known whether weather and temperature impact the spread of COVID-19. Some other viruses, like the common cold and flu, spread more during cold weather months but that does not mean it is impossible to become sick with these viruses during other months.  At this time, it is not known whether the spread of COVID-19 will decrease when weather becomes warmer.  There is much more to learn about the transmissibility, severity, and other features associated with COVID-19 and investigations are ongoing.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 926

    What is community spread?

    Question
    What is community spread? Kinder

    Reply

    Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 927

    What temperature kills the virus that causes COVID-19?

    Question
    What temperature kills the virus that causes COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    Generally coronaviruses survive for shorter periods of time at higher temperatures and higher humidity than in cooler or dryer environments. However, we don Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 928

    Am I at risk for COVID-19 in the United States?

    Question
    Am I at risk for COVID-19 in the United States? Kinder

    Reply

    This is a rapidly evolving situation and the risk assessment may change daily. The latest updates are available on CDC Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 929

    Has anyone in the United States gotten infected?

    Question
    Has anyone in the United States gotten infected? Kinder

    Reply

    Yes. There have been cases of COVID-19 in the U.S. related to travel and through close contact. U.S. case counts are updated regularly Mondays through Fridays. See the current U.S. case count of COVID-19.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 930

    How can I help protect myself?

    Question
    How can I help protect myself? Kinder

    Reply

    Visit the COVID-19 Prevention and Treatment page to learn about how to protect yourself from respiratory illnesses, like COVID-19.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 931

    What should I do if I had close contact with someone who has COVID-19?

    Question
    What should I do if I had close contact with someone who has COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    There is information for people who have had close contact with a person confirmed to have, or being evaluated for, COVID-19 available online.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 932

    Who is at higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19?

    Question
    Who is at higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    Older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions may be at higher risk for more serious complications from COVID-19. These people who may be at higher risk of getting very sick from this illness, includes:

    • Older adults
    • People who have serious underlying medical conditions like:
      • Heart disease
      • Diabetes
      • Lung disease
    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 933

    What should people at higher risk of serious illness with COVID-19 do?

    Question
    What should people at higher risk of serious illness with COVID-19 do? Kinder

    Reply

    If you are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, you should: stock up on supplies; take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others; when you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick; limit close contact and wash your hands often; and avoid crowds, cruise travel, and non-essential travel. If there is an outbreak in your community, stay home as much as possible. Watch for symptoms and emergency signs. If you get sick, stay home and call your doctor. More information on how to prepare, what to do if you get sick, and how communities and caregivers can support those at higher risk is available on People at Risk for Serious Illness from COVID-19.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 934

    Does CDC recommend the use of facemask to prevent COVID-19?

    Question
    Does CDC recommend the use of facemask to prevent COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19. You should only wear a mask if a healthcare professional recommends it. A facemask should be used by people who have COVID-19 and are showing symptoms. This is to protect others from the risk of getting infected. The use of facemasks also is crucial for health workers and other people who are taking care of someone infected with COVID-19 in close settings (at home or in a health care facility).

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 935

    Am I at risk for COVID-19 from a package or products shipping from China?

    Question
    Am I at risk for COVID-19 from a package or products shipping from China? Kinder

    Reply

    There is still a lot that is unknown about the newly emerged COVID-19 and how it spreads. Two other coronaviruses have emerged previously to cause severe illness in people (MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV). The virus that causes COVID-19 is more genetically related to SARS-CoV than MERS-CoV, but both are betacoronaviruses with their origins in bats. While we don Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 936

    Is it okay for me to donate blood?

    Question
    Is it okay for me to donate blood? Kinder

    Reply

    In healthcare settings all across the United States, donated blood is a lifesaving, essential part of caring for patients. The need for donated blood is constant, and blood centers are open and in urgent need of donations. CDC encourages people who are well to continue to donate blood if they are able, even if they are practicing social distancing because of COVID-19. CDC is supporting blood centers by providing recommendations that will keep donors and staff safe. Examples of these recommendations include spacing donor chairs 6 feet apart, thoroughly adhering to environmental cleaning practices, and encouraging donors to make donation appointments ahead of time.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 937

    What is the risk of my child becoming sick with COVID-19?

    Question
    What is the risk of my child becoming sick with COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    Based on available evidence, children do not appear to be at higher risk for COVID-19 than adults. While some children and infants have been sick with COVID-19, adults make up most of the known cases to date. You can learn more about who is most at risk for health problems if they have COVID-19 infection on CDC Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 938

    How can I protect my child from COVID-19 infection?

    Question
    How can I protect my child from COVID-19 infection? Kinder

    Reply

    You can encourage your child to help stop the spread of COVID-19 by teaching them to do the same things everyone should do to stay healthy.

    • Clean hands often using soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer
    • Avoid people who are sick (coughing and sneezing)
    • Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces daily in household common areas (e.g. tables, hard-backed chairs, doorknobs, light switches, remotes, handles, desks, toilets, sinks)
    • Launder items including washable plush toys as appropriate in accordance with the manufacturer Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

      Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

      Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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      Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 939

    Are the symptoms of COVID-19 different in children than in adults?

    Question
    Are the symptoms of COVID-19 different in children than in adults? Kinder

    Reply

    No. The symptoms of COVID-19 are similar in children and adults. However, children with confirmed COVID-19 have generally presented with mild symptoms. Reported symptoms in children include cold-like symptoms, such as fever, runny nose, and cough. Vomiting and diarrhea have also been reported. It Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 940

    Should children wear masks?

    Question
    Should children wear masks? Kinder

    Reply

    No. If your child is healthy, there is no need for them to wear a facemask. Only people who have symptoms of illness or who are providing care to those who are ill should wear masks.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 941

    How can my family and I prepare for COVID-19?

    Question
    How can my family and I prepare for COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    Create a household plan of action to help protect your health and the health of those you care about in the event of an outbreak of COVID-19 in your community:

    • Talk with the people who need to be included in your plan, and discuss what to do if a COVID-19 outbreak occurs in your community.
    • Plan ways to care for those who might be at greater risk for serious complications, particularly older adults and those with severe chronic medical conditions like heart, lung or kidney disease.
      • Make sure they have access to several weeks of medications and supplies in case you need to stay home for prolonged periods of time.
    • Get to know your neighbors and find out if your neighborhood has a website or social media page to stay connected.
    • Create a list of local organizations that you and your household can contact in the event you need access to information, healthcare services, support, and resources.
    • Create an emergency contact list of family, friends, neighbors, carpool drivers, health care providers, teachers, employers, the local public health department, and other community resources.
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    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Kinder
    Question ID: 942

    What steps can my family take to reduce our risk of getting COVID-19?

    Question
    What steps can my family take to reduce our risk of getting COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    Practice everyday preventive actions to help reduce your risk of getting sick and remind everyone in your home to do the same. These actions are especially important for older adults and people who have severe chronic medical conditions:

    • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
    • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.
    • Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue and throw the tissue in the trash.
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food.
    • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
    • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects
      (e.g., tables, countertops, light switches, doorknobs, and cabinet handles).
    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Kinder
    Question ID: 943

    What should I do if someone in my house gets sick with COVID-19?

    Question
    What should I do if someone in my house gets sick with COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    Most people who get COVID-19 will be able to recover at home. CDC has directions for people who are recovering at home and their caregivers, including:

    • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.
    When to Seek Medical Attention

    If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. Emergency warning signs include*:

    • Trouble breathing
    • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
    • New confusion or inability to arouse
    • Bluish lips or face

    *This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning.

    • Use a separate room and bathroom for sick household members (if possible).
    • Clean hands regularly by handwashing with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
    • Provide your sick household member with clean disposable facemasks to wear at home, if available, to help prevent spreading COVID-19 to others.
    • Clean the sick room and bathroom, as needed, to avoid unnecessary contact with the sick person.
    • Avoid sharing personal items like utensils, food, and drinks.
    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Kinder
    Question ID: 944

    How can I prepare in case my child

    Question
    How can I prepare in case my child Kinder

    Reply

    Talk to the school or facility about their emergency operations plan. Understand the plan for continuing education and social services (such as student meal programs) during school dismissals. If your child attends a college or university, encourage them to learn about the school Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Kinder
    Question ID: 945

    How can I prepare for COVID-19 at work?

    Question
    How can I prepare for COVID-19 at work? Kinder

    Reply

    Plan for potential changes at your workplace. Talk to your employer about their emergency operations plan, including sick-leave policies and telework options. Learn how businesses and employers can plan for and respond to COVID-19.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Kinder
    Question ID: 946

    Should I use soap and water or a hand sanitizer to protect against COVID-19?

    Question
    Should I use soap and water or a hand sanitizer to protect against COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    Handwashing is one of the best ways to protect yourself and your family from getting sick. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.

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    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Kinder
    Question ID: 947

    What cleaning products should I use to protect against COVID-19?

    Question
    What cleaning products should I use to protect against COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces such as tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.  If surfaces are dirty, clean them using detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection. To disinfect, most common EPA-registered household disinfectants will work. See CDC Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Kinder
    Question ID: 948

    What should I do if there is an outbreak in my community?

    Question
    What should I do if there is an outbreak in my community? Kinder

    Reply

    During an outbreak, stay calm and put your preparedness plan to work. Follow the steps below:

    Protect yourself and others.

    • Stay home if you are sick. Keep away from people who are sick. Limit close contact with others as much as possible (about 6 feet).

    Put your household plan into action.

    • Stay informed about the local COVID-19 situation. Be aware of temporary school dismissals in your area, as this may affect your household Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

      Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

      Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Kinder
    Question ID: 949

    How do I prepare my children in case of COVID-19 outbreak in our community?

    Question
    How do I prepare my children in case of COVID-19 outbreak in our community? Kinder

    Reply

    Outbreaks can be stressful for adults and children. Talk with your children about the outbreak, try to stay calm, and reassure them that they are safe. If appropriate, explain to them that most illness from COVID-19 seems to be mild. Children respond differently to stressful situations than adults.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Kinder
    Question ID: 950

    What steps should parents take to protect children during a community outbreak?

    Question
    What steps should parents take to protect children during a community outbreak? Kinder

    Reply

    This is a new virus and we are still learning about it, but so far, there does not seem to be a lot of illness in children. Most illness, including serious illness, is happening in adults of working age and older adults. If there cases of COVID-19 that impact your child Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Kinder
    Question ID: 951

    Will schools be dismissed if there is an outbreak in my community?

    Question
    Will schools be dismissed if there is an outbreak in my community? Kinder

    Reply

    Depending on the situation, public health officials may recommend community actions to reduce exposures to COVID-19, such as school dismissals. Read or watch local media sources that report school dismissals or and watch for communication from your child Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    We are an editorial team that answers the questions through trusted sources, the answers do not constitute medical advice, nor are they legally binding. The answers represent our state of knowledge. If you're unsure, ask an official source.

    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 952

    Should I go to work if there is an outbreak in my community?

    Question
    Should I go to work if there is an outbreak in my community? Kinder

    Reply

    Follow the advice of your local health officials. Stay home if you can. Talk to your employer to discuss working from home, taking leave if you or someone in your household gets sick with COVID-19 symptoms, or if your child Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 953

    What are the symptoms and complications that COVID-19 can cause?

    Question
    What are the symptoms and complications that COVID-19 can cause? Kinder

    Reply

    Current symptoms reported for patients with COVID-19 have included mild to severe respiratory illness with fever1, cough, and difficulty breathing. Read about COVID-19 Symptoms.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 954

    Should I be tested for COVID-19?

    Question
    Should I be tested for COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    Not everyone needs to be tested for COVID-19. For information about testing, see Testing for COVID-19.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 955

    Where can I get tested for COVID-19?

    Question
    Where can I get tested for COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    The process and locations for testing vary from place to place. Contact your state, local, tribal, or territorial department for more information, or reach out to a medical provider. State and local public health departments have received tests from CDC while medical providers are getting tests developed by commercial manufacturers. While supplies of these tests are increasing, it may still be difficult to find someplace to get tested. See Testing for COVID-19 for more information.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 956

    Can a person test negative and later test positive for COVID-19?

    Question
    Can a person test negative and later test positive for COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    Using the CDC-developed diagnostic test, a negative result means that the virus that causes COVID-19 was not found in the person Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 957

    Why might someone blame or avoid individuals and groups (create stigma) because of COVID-19?

    Question
    Why might someone blame or avoid individuals and groups (create stigma) because of COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    People in the U.S. may be worried or anxious about friends and relatives who are living in or visiting areas where COVID-19 is spreading. Some people are worried about the disease. Fear and anxiety can lead to social stigma, for example, towards Chinese or other Asian Americans or people who were in quarantine.

    Stigma is discrimination against an identifiable group of people, a place, or a nation. Stigma is associated with a lack of knowledge about how COVID-19 spreads, a need to blame someone, fears about disease and death, and gossip that spreads rumors and myths.

    Stigma hurts everyone by creating more fear or anger towards ordinary people instead of the disease that is causing the problem.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 958

    How can people help stop stigma related to COVID-19?

    Question
    How can people help stop stigma related to COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    People can fight stigma and help, not hurt, others by providing social support. Counter stigma by learning and sharing facts. Communicating the facts that viruses do not target specific racial or ethnic groups and how COVID-19 actually spreads can help stop stigma.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 959

    Who is at higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19?

    Question
    Who is at higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    COVID-19 is a new disease and there is limited information regarding risk factors for severe disease. Based on currently available information and clinical expertise, older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions might be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

    Based upon available information to date, those at high-risk for severe illness from COVID-19 include:

    • People aged 65 years and older
    • People who live in a nursing home or long-term care facility
    • Other high-risk conditions could include:
      • People with chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma
      • People who have heart disease with complications
      • People who are immunocompromised including cancer treatment
      • People of any age with severe obesity (body mass index [(BM]I)≥40) or certain underlying medical conditions, particularly if not well controlled, such as those with diabetes, renal failure, or liver disease might also be at risk
    • People who are pregnant should be monitored since they are known to be at risk with severe viral illness, however, to date data on COVID-19 has not shown increased risk
    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 960

    How were the underlying conditions selected?

    Question
    How were the underlying conditions selected? Kinder

    Reply

    This list is based on:

    • What we are learning from the outbreak in other countries and in the United States.
    • What we know about risk from other respiratory infections, like flu.

    As CDC gets more information about COVID-19 cases here in the US, we will update this list as needed.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 961

    What about underlying medical conditions that are not included on this list?

    Question
    What about underlying medical conditions that are not included on this list? Kinder

    Reply

    Based on available information, adults aged 65 years and older and people of any age with underlying medical conditions included on this list are at higher risk for severe illness and poorer outcomes from COVID-19. CDC is collecting and analyzing data regularly and will update the list when we learn more. People with underlying medical conditions not on the list might also be at higher risk and should consult with their healthcare provider if they are concerned.

    We encourage all people, regardless of risk, to:

    • Take steps to protect yourself and others.
    • Call your healthcare provider if you are sick with a fever, cough, or shortness of breath.
    • Follow CDC travel guidelines and the recommendations of your state and local health officials.
    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 962

    What does well controlled mean?

    Question
    What does well controlled mean? Kinder

    Reply

    Generally, well-controlled means that your condition is stable, not life-threatening, and laboratory assessments and other findings are as similar as possible to those without the health condition. You should talk with your healthcare provider if you have a question about your health or how your health condition is being managed.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 963

    What does more severe illness mean?

    Question
    What does more severe illness mean? Kinder

    Reply

    Severity typically means how much impact the illness or condition has on your body Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 964

    Are people with disabilities at higher risk?

    Question
    Are people with disabilities at higher risk? Kinder

    Reply

    Most people with disabilities are not inherently at higher risk for becoming infected with or having severe illness from COVID-19.  Some people with physical limitations or other disabilities might be at a higher risk of infection because of their underlying medical condition.

     

    People with certain disabilities might experience higher rates of chronic health conditions that put them at higher risk of serious illness and poorer outcomes from COVID-19.

    • Adults with disabilities are three times more likely to have heart disease, stroke, diabetes, or cancer than adults without disabilities.

    You should talk with your healthcare provider if you have a question about your health or how your health condition is being managed.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 965

    What should healthcare professionals and health departments do?

    Question
    What should healthcare professionals and health departments do? Kinder

    Reply

    For recommendations and guidance on persons under investigation; infection control, including personal protective equipment guidance; home care and isolation; and case investigation, see Information for Healthcare Professionals. For information on specimen collection and shipment, see Information for Laboratories. For information for public health professional on COVID-19, see Information for Public Health Professionals.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 966

    Am I at risk if I go to a funeral or visitation service for someone who died of COVID-19?

    Question
    Am I at risk if I go to a funeral or visitation service for someone who died of COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    There is currently no known risk associated with being in the same room at a funeral or visitation service with the body of someone who died of COVID-19.

    Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 967

    Am I at risk if I touch someone who died of COVID-19 after they have passed away?

    Question
    Am I at risk if I touch someone who died of COVID-19 after they have passed away? Kinder

    Reply

    COVID-19 is a new disease and we are still learning how it spreads. The virus that causes COVID-19 is thought to mainly spread from close contact (i.e., within about 6 feet) with a person who is currently sick with COVID-19. The virus likely spreads primarily through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes, similar to how influenza and other respiratory infections spread. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. This type of spread is not a concern after death.

    It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

    People should consider not touching the body of someone who has died of COVID-19. Older people and people of all ages with severe underlying health conditions are at higher risk of developing serious COVID-19 illness. There may be less of a chance of the virus spreading from certain types of touching, such as holding the hand or hugging after the body has been prepared for viewing. Other activities, such as kissing, washing, and shrouding should be avoided before, during, and after the body has been prepared, if possible. If washing the body or shrouding are important religious or cultural practices, families are encouraged to work with their community cultural and religious leaders and funeral home staff on how to reduce their exposure as much as possible. At a minimum, people conducting these activities should wear disposable gloves. If splashing of fluids is expected, additional personal protective equipment (PPE) may be required (such as disposable gown, faceshield or goggles and facemask).

    Cleaning should be conducted in accordance with manufacturer Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 968

    What do Funeral Home Workers need to know about handling decedents who had COVID-19?

    Question
    What do Funeral Home Workers need to know about handling decedents who had COVID-19? Kinder

    Reply

    A funeral or visitation service can be held for a person who has died of COVID-19. Funeral home workers should follow their routine infection prevention and control precautions when handling a decedent who died of COVID-19. If it is necessary to transfer a body to a bag, follow Standard Precautions, including additional personal protective equipment (PPE) if splashing of fluids is expected. For transporting a body after the body has been bagged, disinfect the outside of the bag with a product with EPA-approved emerging viral pathogens claimspdf iconexternal icon expected to be effective against COVID-19 based on data for harder to kill viruses. Follow the manufacturer Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39
    Deutschlandweit
    Kinder
    Question ID: 969

    What should I do if my family member died from COVID-19 while overseas?

    Question
    What should I do if my family member died from COVID-19 while overseas? Kinder

    Reply

    When a US citizen dies outside the United States, the deceased person Answer supported by the COVID QA Project

    Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) and Children

    Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


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    Reply refers to the state of knowledge of: 28.03.2020 13:39